Media’s Role in Education

The act of educating doesn’t simply occur in classrooms, lecture halls, or over zoom.

Media plays a role in exposing us to different viewpoints, mental models, and how others think. In an earlier blog, I outlined at a high level the themes we were exploring in a previous EdTech project I was involved in, and to continue that exploration I want to focus on the role of media and content consumption in

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Environmental Justice

In our modern society, laws exist to regulate the actions of parties that harm others in our society, but it’s important to understand that the existence of a law and the enforcement of the same law are two very different concepts.

In December 2019, the TRACED Act, the first federal anti-robocall law passed, but the enforcement of the TRACED Act and similar past anti-robocall laws were a difficult process for most consumers prior to

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Disparate Justice

It seems that every other day there is another tragedy involving the police and unarmed black men and women.  Some of these incidents are recorded on smartphones and trigger a collective sense of disappointment and questions of why this had to happen.

I want to avoid discussing the intricate details of each case as each situation was unique but there is an underlying power structure that has been cultivated that breeds this kind of

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Personalized Learning

At Honeybird, I was part of the founding team, where I lead the initial user research and product development.

The core premise we examined was that education in a child’s early years can be personalized with technology as a supporting element to the educator.

That same technology could also enable all the stakeholders in a child’s life to participate in the education process.  Why is it we typically think of

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Unified Climate Sustainability Framework

My climate journey has been a long time coming, gestating since I first watched An Inconvenient Truth in 2006. I later took a course in environmental studies at Santa Monica College that same year. For the last fourteen years I was always been ‘aware but not active’; I never really did much more beyond recycling, the occasional tree planting, and just being a conscious consumer (whenever the option was frictionless).

In the last three

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Remote Learning’s Hidden Curriculum

My involvement in EdTech through the work being done at Qureos has had me thinking of how we could localize for a more specific US-market problem. Product Market Fit in Dubai might be able to translate into PMF in a different region but just trying to adapt for the same PMF, we might miss opportunities for other grander problems that could potentially be solved with the same solution.

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about

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The Role of Politics in Progress

I recently read The Atlantic article “How a Plan to Save the Power System Disappeared” and it made me rehash a previous thought-note I had made before.

The role of politics is not to be underestimated in the progress we make (or don’t make) in society, whether it comes to energy/climate, health, infrastructure, technologies, etc.

Political opinions aside, I want us to look at how certain decisions by politicians

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Biology vs. Sociology

With optimistic projections of a COVID-19 vaccine on the horizon sometime in late 2020 or early 2021 (see: Pfizer and Moderna beginning Phase 3 trials and Oxford’s ‘so-far’ successful trials) there is another factor often not talked about in the fight against COVID-19.

We might be tackling the biological issue with the development of vaccines, but the societal issues of actually administering and distributing the vaccine are yet to be widely

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Thoughts on Quibi

Quibi was ambitious in thinking that the format of content should adapt to how we watch (whether portrait or landscape) and empowered users to watch in the format of their choice. 

However orientation is barely scratching the surface, what they failed to consider is that context and co-creation matter more in a short attention format.

Consider

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Everything old is… old (for now)

As author Stephen King wrote in The Colorado Kid,

“Sooner or later, everything old is new again.”

It maintains some truth if we look back at the Spanish Flu pandemic, a time where some defied face mask usage and individual cities tackled the pandemic in various ways.  However, there are some things that just feel old now.

If you watched Jerry Seinfeld’s comedy special on Netflix, “23 Hours to Kill” it was very apparent it was filmed

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